New Years with the Danish

This year we celebrated NYE in Denmark! We have witnessed the fireworks in Amsterdam and were told these are some of the best fireworks in Europe, but the fireworks in Copenhagen are INSANE. I cannot even fathom how I am going to begin to depict the craziness of the fireworks in Denmark. So here it is…
Fireworks in the Square
Fireworks are being lit all day and all night long. I’m not even referring to the scheduled professional ones, these are your amateur neighbors store-bought fireworks. The most popular professional fireworks are launched at 11 pm inside Tivoli park (more on this famous amusement park later on). Then the party continues just outside the gate in the City Hall Square.
Tivoli Fireworks
Picture this, a couple thousand people of all ages, forming a circle and literally tossing any fireworks they have into the circle of people observing. It starts out as all fun and games, but it gets loud, crazy and chaotic. I literally witnessed people getting hit with fireworks, or panicking and knocking themselves out while trying to escape the upcoming sparks – one gentleman tried to run away from a misfiring firework, tripped and hit his head on the pavement and literally knocked himself out, this was our cue to turn in for the night.
Tivoli Gardens
Tivoli Gardens is where we launched our celebrations. It is the second oldest amusement park in the world and was visited often by Walt Disney for inspiration. It opened in 1843 and is still functioning today. But it is expensive. To gain an entrance that does not include any rides you may have to give them your first born. Yes, it is beautiful, like a winter wonderland, light show and fake snow included. But unless you plan on standing in line and enjoying every ride, it may not actually be worth it. Even the food inside will cost an arm or leg!
Tivoli Gardens
Bringing me to my next point. It was increasingly difficult to find authentic Danish food in Denmark! They have a variety of choices from Chinese, to American, Dutch, Italian, etc, but Danish was not always on the menu. Now, this may be because we were here over the holidays and many restaurants were closed or Google Maps is not updated. Even with the conversion to their currency, the DKK, much like Zurich, Copenhagen is very expensive. My favorite stop to eat was at A Hereford Beefstouw, they had an incredible vegetarian steak! That’s a first! A runner up is Tivoli food hall as it has a variety of eats for all the foodies out there (you do not need to purchase a ticket for the park to enter this hall FYI).

Even in the high wind chill, and on the day of hangovers, they still run the free walking tour in Copenhagen. It was very informative and ran by a very enthusiastic guide whose fascination with the city was contagious. Having a guide is helpful maneuvering through the windy streets as Copenhagen is actually very large and spread out.
Changing Of The Guard
If you are there for a short trip, here are 5 places that you must include in your itinerary:

1) Christiansborg Palace is large, beautiful and a popular tourist attraction (as this is where you will find the Supreme Court, Ministry of State and the Royal Stables). We were lucky enough to watch them rehearse the equestrian show for the Queen’s party that night!
Copenhagen, Denmark
2) The Round Tower is super unique, I’ve never been in something quite like this. To reach the viewing platform at the top you don’t actually climb stairs, but instead, ascend up a flat (ish) winding ramp. There are little stops on the way with little surprises to add to the excitement.
The Round Tower
3) You cannot visit this city without a stroll down Nyhavn, better known as the canal with a row of colorful houses and old sailboats. This 17th-century waterfront and entertainment district is very photogenic, but unfortunately not authentic (thanks walking tour!). Sorry to burst your bubble, but the boats that are docked there are paid to be there to draw in tourists. Though the houses were constructed from 1670-1673, and once housed Hans Christian Anderson (in 1845-1864), they have been reconstructed and painted to draw you in. But who cares, the street is super pretty and photogenic, giving you a feel of what it may have been back in the day.
Nyhavn
4) The Little Mermaid statue is bronze and placed on a small rock by the waterside. Much like the Mona Lisa in Paris, it is a tiny attraction that creates quite a crowd. This statue is based on the fairy-tale by the same name and was unveiled in 1913. It often gets decapitated or vandalized on a yearly bases. You can go right up to it on the rocks or from a safe distance via a boat tour.
The Little Mermaid Statue
5) The Danish War Museum was surprisingly one of my favourite stops on this trip. It was a lot bigger than anticipated and had the most cannons I have ever seen at once. The focus is mainly on past wars just affecting Copenhagen; did you know they had the biggest Navy at one time? I definitely recommend this museum, it was very informative with lots to look at. It is also housed in an old military fort!
Danish War Museum
Overall this city had its charm, but I think would have been more enjoyable if most attractions were not closed for the holidays. If you plan on starting your New Year here you will experience the craziest fireworks ever, but there is a limited amount of attractions to occupy yourself in between.

Still not finished your coffee and want more to read? Check out my latest articles for other publications! Exiting Expat Life for Verge Magazine is all about my mixed feelings of moving back to Canada from The Netherlands. If you are an adrenaline junkie keep South Africa on your radar, with 8 activities you can do there! Check out my Geargreed article HERE!
Melissa in Amsterdam
Cheers,
Melissa

 

One thought on “New Years with the Danish

Add yours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: